The Bridge At The Edge Of The World

Author: James Gustave Speth
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300151152
Size: 57.61 MB
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Presents an analysis of modern capitalism and its impact on the global environmental crises, and discusses how the transformation of current economic and political systems can lead to environmental sustainability.

The Bridge At The Edge Of The World

Author: James Gustave Speth
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300145304
Size: 68.89 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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How serious are the threats to our environment? Here is one measure of the problem: if we continue to do exactly what we are doing, with no growth in the human population or the world economy, the world in the latter part of this century will be unfit to live in. Of course human activities are not holding at current levels—they are accelerating, dramatically—and so, too, is the pace of climate disruption, biotic impoverishment, and toxification. In this book Gus Speth, author of Red Sky at Morning and a widely respected environmentalist, begins with the observation that the environmental community has grown in strength and sophistication, but the environment has continued to decline, to the point that we are now at the edge of catastrophe. Speth contends that this situation is a severe indictment of the economic and political system we call modern capitalism. Our vital task is now to change the operating instructions for today's destructive world economy before it is too late. The book is about how to do that.

The Bridge At The Edge Of The World

Author: James Gustave Speth
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780300136111
Size: 62.46 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This severe indictment of modern capitalism examines how the environment has continued to decline as a result of today's destructive world economy and provides information on how to change this situation.

Red Sky At Morning

Author: James Gustave Speth
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300102321
Size: 36.31 MB
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Presents an analysis of the worsening global environmental crisis, citing ten contributors to environmental deterioration, including affluence, the American culture and its values, population, and poverty.

Requiem For A Species

Author: Clive Hamilton
Publisher: Earthscan
ISBN: 1849710813
Size: 35.50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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To some, the term encompasses innovation, change and commitment to the future and to others it means preservation, conservativism and a watchful eye on the future.City Fightsfollows on from the symposium "Energy and Urban Strategies", which bro

Angels By The River

Author: James Gustave Speth
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603585869
Size: 10.50 MB
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Reflections on race, environment, politics, and living on the front lines of change In Angels by the River, James Gustave "Gus" Speth recounts his unlikely path from a southern boyhood through his years as one of the nation's most influential mainstream environmentalists and eventually to the system-changing activism that shapes his current work. Born and raised in an idyllic but racially divided town that later became the scene of South Carolina's horrific Orangeburg Massacre, Speth explores how the civil rights movement and the South's agrarian roots shaped his later work in the heyday of the environmental movement, when he founded two landmark environmental groups, fought for the nation's toughest environmental laws, spearheaded programs in the United Nations, advised the White House, and moved into a leading academic role as dean of Yale's prestigious School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Yet, in the end, he arrived somewhere quite unexpected–still believing change is possible, but not within the current political and economic system. Throughout this compelling memoir, Speth intertwines three stories–his own, his hometown's, and his country's–focusing mainly on his early years and the lessons he drew from them, and his later years, in which he comes full circle in applying those lessons. In the process he invites others to join him politically at or near the place at which he has arrived, wherever they may have started.

America The Possible

Author: James Gustave Speth
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780300198348
Size: 30.12 MB
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In this volume, James Gustave Speth looks at the sea of troubles in which the United States now finds itself, charts a course through the discouragement and despair commonly felt today, and envisions what he calls 'America the Possible', an attractive future that we can still realize.

Representing The Plague In Early Modern England

Author: Rebecca Totaro
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136963235
Size: 51.52 MB
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This collection offers readers a timely encounter with the historical experience of people adapting to a pandemic emergency and the corresponding narrative representation of that crisis, as early modern writers transformed the plague into literature. The essays examine the impact of the plague on health, politics, and religion as well as on the plays, prose fiction, and plague bills that stand as witnesses to the experience of a society devastated by contagious disease. Readers will find physicians and moralists wrestling with the mysteries of the disease; erotic escapades staged in plague-time plays; the poignant prose works of William Bullein and Thomas Dekker; the bodies of monarchs who sought to protect themselves from plague; the chameleon-like nature of the plague as literal disease and as metaphor; and future strains of plague, literary and otherwise, which we may face in the globally-minded, technology-dependent, and ecologically-awakened twenty-first century. The bubonic plague compelled change in all aspects of lived experience in Early Modern England, but at the same time, it opened space for writers to explore new ideas and new literary forms—not all of them somber or horrifying and some of them downright hilarious. By representing the plague for their audiences, these writers made an epidemic calamity intelligible: for them, the dreaded disease could signify despair but also hope, bewilderment but also a divine plan, quarantine but also liberty, death but also new life.

Joints And Connective Tissues

Author: Kerryn Phelps
Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
ISBN: 0729582175
Size: 24.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Joints and Connective Tissues - General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series. In order to diagnose and manage the patient presenting with musculoskeletal symptoms, it is important to distinguish whether the pathology is arising primarily in the so-called hard tissues (such as bone) or the soft tissues (such as cartilage, disc, synovium, capsule, muscle, tendon, tendon sheath). It is also important to distinguish between the two most common causes of musculoskeletal symptoms, namely inflammatory and degenerative.

Between God Green

Author: Katharine K. Wilkinson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199942854
Size: 64.53 MB
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Despite three decades of scientists' warnings and environmentalists' best efforts, the political will and public engagement necessary to fuel robust action on global climate change remain in short supply. Katharine K. Wilkinson shows that, contrary to popular expectations, faith-based efforts are emerging and strengthening to address this problem. In the US, perhaps none is more significant than evangelical climate care. Drawing on extensive focus group and textual research and interviews, Between God & Green explores the phenomenon of climate care, from its historical roots and theological grounding to its visionary leaders and advocacy initiatives. Wilkinson examines the movement's reception within the broader evangelical community, from pew to pulpit. She shows that by engaging with climate change as a matter of private faith and public life, leaders of the movement challenge traditional boundaries of the evangelical agenda, partisan politics, and established alliances and hostilities. These leaders view sea-level rise as a moral calamity, lobby for legislation written on both sides of the aisle, and partner with atheist scientists. Wilkinson reveals how evangelical environmentalists are reshaping not only the landscape of American climate action, but the contours of their own religious community. Though the movement faces complex challenges, climate care leaders continue to leverage evangelicalism's size, dominance, cultural position, ethical resources, and mechanisms of communication to further their cause to bridge God and green.